Raw Recipes

almond butter

Posted on June 07 2012 | (6) Comments
Category: Raw Dessert and Snack Recipes

almond butter

Yield: 3/4 cup

Did you know you could make homemade almond butter in a food processor? Raw almond butter can be purchased at most natural food stores, but homemade is more
economical and fresh. I like it with celery stalks and raisins (remember Ants on a Log?), smeared on a banana, or sandwiched between two apple slices.

Ingredients

  • 1 cup almonds, unsoaked
  • Dash salt

Equipment

  • measuring cups
  • food processor
  • rubber spatula

Put the almonds and salt in a food processor fitted with the S blade and process for 5 to 10 minutes, or until the almonds are ground into a paste, stopping occasionally to scrape down the work bowl with a rubber spatula. Stored in a sealed container in the refrigerator, Almond Butter will keep for 3 months.

Per 2 tablespoons: calories: 137, protein: 5 g, fat: 12 g, carbohydrate: 5 g, fiber: 3 g, sodium: 22 mg

Cashew Butter: Replace the almonds with 1 cup of raw unsoaked cashews.
 


Previous Comments

On September 17, 2012 .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) said...

i thought almonds needed soaking to remove toxins.

On September 18, 2012 .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) said...

Hi Cindy,

I don’t know if I’d call ‘em toxins, but yes, soaking does make almonds more digestible. But so does grinding them in a food processor. And for nut butter to have the right texture, they can’t be soaked

(you could of course soak and dehydrate them but that’s too much work for me!)

Jenny

On March 08, 2013 .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) said...

Hi Cindy,  I have a feeling you might be referring to the enzyme inhibitors of nuts and seeds. Basically nuts are not ready to germinate until certain conditions i.e moisture, is met.

These inhibitors and possible toxic substances are enzyme inhibitors, phytates (phytic acid), polyphenols (tannins), and goitrogens.

Soaking nuts and seeds is great and sprouting them is even better if you have time. As Jenny has mentioned there are some recipes that would be a total mess if the nuts were soaked, i.e cashew and goji power balls, i learnt that lesson when i was starting out, YUK!

Good luck Cindy hope your happy and healthy:-)

On April 11, 2013 .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) said...

Hi Jenny,
I am new to Raw Food dining and am so excited. I have just went through a ten day fast and am starting the slow integration of feeding. It has been a wonderful experience so far, and I look forward to learning more. Thank you for your DVD Raw Food Made Easy. There are truly some creative dishes that I can’t wait to make. I have one question. My friend’s son is allegic to nuts and seeds. What would be a good substitution for them? I told her I thought according to some of your recipes they are used just as a type of filler. However, some recipes they are the main ingredients. What should I tell her? Thanks again for your knowledge!

On May 09, 2013 .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) said...

Hi Jenny,
I love your blog. I have a few questions on this recipe. Are the almonds without skins? How do I take the skins off? Is it better to get sliced almonds? Is natural peanut butter not as healthy or is it ok to use peanuts too? and should almonds, peanuts, etc. be toasted before processing? Thank you so much.

On May 09, 2013 .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address) said...

Hi Yuri,

You can use regular raw almonds (not toasted), with the skins on. The skins are removed when you strain the milk through a strainer or mesh bag.

More people tend to be sensitive to peanuts (actually a legume, not a nut), so I prefer to use other nut butters instead of peanuts.

Jenny


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